Luke Bradley 2014 Thomas Family Scholarship Winner Outstanding for Canada at U20 Level

As the 2015 Scholarship announcements are on the horizon we look back on the 2014 scholarship awards. One of the recipients was Luke Bradley of Port Alberni.

Luke went onto represent Canada at the Junior World Trophy Tournament (JWRT) and was one of Canada’s outstanding players at #8. Canada finished 2nd which matched their highest finish in recent history, they lost to Georgia who were promoted to the top tier Junior World Championship. The good news for Luke and Canada is that he has another year of eligibility at the U20 level, also look for him to get a few starts with the Vikes Premier team this season.

Here is what he wrote on his profile in 2014, he not only achieved his goal of making the Canada U20 team but he did it in style.

Well done Luke!

Luke Bradley profile from 2014

Birthplace: Port Alberni, BC
Favourite memory growing up: Hanging out with my friend Dallas
Position played: 6 or 8
First year playing rugby: Grade seven
Favourite coach: Jas Purewal
Most influential person in life: Jas Purewal
Favourite rugby memory: First time putting on the Canada jersey
Worst rugby memory: Losing to Ontario in the national championship finals
Favourite movie: 300
Favourite musician: Nickleback
Favourite book: Harry Potter
Career plans: Mechanic
Rugby goals in next 2 years: Make Canada U20
Favourite other hobby: Lifting weights

LukeBradley

Antonio Corbin Wins First Howard and Marina Gerwing Scholarship

Antonio Corbin is a promising young player with the Cowichan Rugby club who came through the Ladysmith High School program. We congratulate him as the first recipient of the Howard and Marina Gerwing Scholarship.

[photo below show Antonio with Marina and Howard Gerwing]antonio_corbin

Howard and Marina Gerwing Fund

Howard and Marina Gerwing and a matching donor have pledged $10,000 over the next two years to create a fund for scholarships for Cowichan Valley rugby players. Cowichan Valley, outside of Victoria and Vancouver has probably produced as many National Team players at various age levels as anywhere in Canada

Howard Gerwing was the first coach of the University of Victoria Vikings and led them on three historic tours playing the national team of Yugoslavia in 1978 amongst other historic encounters.

Howard is also a bibliophile and built up the Special Collections section of the UVIC library to be a well known national scholastic resource. Long suffering Marina was in charge of domestic matters and the family residence on Palmer Road served for many years as the UVIC clubhouse and home for itinerant and wayward rugby players.

Howard with scant resources was the joint founder of the first UVIC scholarship fund “the Brian Williams” scholarship fund in memory of one of those wayward and talented players who sadly took his own life in 1987.

Dick Ellis Memorial Fund Provides Support to National Team Captains

The Dick Ellis Memorial Fund (DEMF) originated in 1978 as an ongoing memorial to Mr. Dick Ellis, a Rugby Canada President, who had passed away in office. Donations were provided at the time of Mr. Ellis’s death, and since its inception the trustees of this fund have been distributing financial awards ranging in degree for worthwhile educational Rugby projects across Canada.Continue reading

Canadian Women at the World Cup – Visit to Vimy Ridge

from Rugby Canada website by Bryan Kelly

Canada’s Women’s Rugby Team spent Saturday afternoon at the historic Vimy Ridge National Site of Canada, five days after the 100th Year Anniversary of the commencement of the First World War.

The trip to the monument and war trenches took place one day after Canada defeated Spain 31-5 to open the 2014 IRB Women’s Rugby World Cup in Marcoussis, France.

Vimy Ridge is a major source of pride for all Canadians, as 100 years ago thousands of young men gave their lives to help secure a great victory for the Allies.

At that time, Canada was a relatively young nation, and the victory proved to unite the country under strength, honour and integrity.

“Every time you wear a jersey for Canada, or see the Canadian flag, you have to remember how truly lucky we are and this place is a great source of pride,” said Canada Assistant Coach, Gary Dukelow.

“My grandfather was also here, so for me it’s an even bigger significance and I was fortunate to be here with Canada’s Men’s Team during the 1991 World Cup, and we had a great tournament that year too,” added Dukelow.

The Canadian team, along with travelling family members, took to the trenches and toured both the Canadian and German occupied areas before visitng the monument and Canadian cemetery.

Manitoba native Mandy Marchak – who’s playing in her third Women’s Fifteens World Cup – added her thoughts on visiting the historic site.

“We’re really lucky and fortunate to come to Vimy Ridge today with it being such a big piece of Canadian history. We got to see the underground tunnels, the trenches where they fought and it wouldn’t have been possible without the generosity and support of the Canadian Rugby Foundation, so we’re appreciative of them,” said Marchak.

Information on Vimy Ridge:

“At daybreak on April 9, 1917, all four divisions of the Canadian Corps (aided by the British 5th Division and a considerable number of artillery units), fighting together for the first time, stormed the Ridge. Preceded by a perfectly-timed artillery barrage, the Canadians advanced and, by mid-afternoon, had taken all their objectives except Hill 145 which was captured the following day. Then on April 12, the 4th Canadian Division with the British 24th Division on their left flank, took the Pimple at the northern end of the Ridge.

The hard-fought victory was swift, but did not come without cost. Out of 10,602 casualties, 3,598 Canadians gave their lives.

The victory at Vimy was a significant landmark for Allied fortunes in the First World War and back home in Canada, it united Canadians and brought honour and pride to the young nation.”

(Information via official on-site pamphlet, created by Veteran Affairs Canada)

Canada’s visit to Vimy Ridge would not have been possible without the support of the Canadian Rugby Foundation!